Blue Food

 Posted by  Alaska, Gardening
Oct 262012
 

If you ask me, there isn’t enough blue food.

That’s a line from the Bridget Jones’s Diary movie. I agree: there isn’t enough blue food, especially if you discount fake-blue raspberry products, which I do.

Blue cabbage with broccoli and snow peas

Our purple cabbage is a lovely turquoise blue!

We are currently enjoying some gorgeous blue food. I know this vegetable as “purple cabbage,” but I see on the Web that some people call it “red cabbage.” So far, I’ve not seen it referred to as “blue cabbage,” though that seems most appropriate.

I grew this cabbage, sauteed it just a smidge, and froze it. Now I thaw it, cook it, and eat it. Some of this cabbage is more purple, but a lot is blue like this, and we’re finding it tremendous fun to work with and eat. It’s beautiful! I want to make blue egg rolls. I want to see if it will turn the whole solyanka blue.

In general, I’m not much of a cabbage fan. I grow it because Alaska is famous for giant cabbages, and I think it’s required in all Alaska gardens; there’s a law or something. I don’t like it raw, and I don’t like sauerkraut. But I do like it prepared a few ways, and blue is definitely one of them!

I wonder if, like hydrangeas, soil pH influences the color of cabbage. After an especially poor garden year, I had my soil tested. For years, I’ve been told by neighbors and Alaksa garden books that my soil is most likely very acidic. I was surprised to discover it’s actually pretty neutral, just slightly on the alkaline side. Or maybe it’s a nutrient issue: I’ve got tons of potassium and very little nitrogen. Anyone have experience with or ideas about this?

Time will tell as I alter the balance of nutrients in the garden, but in the meantime, I’m loving my blue food!

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